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Mikechomko Mikechomko 7 March
0

Did Charles J. Ravel Actually Create Covers for THE SHADOW

According to user shoofly, Street & Smith art director Charles J. Ravel created the cover art for SHADOW MYSTERY #312 to #316. The dates of these issues begin with February/March 1947 and run through October/November 1947. I attempted to contact user shoofly to learn where he or she found the information about the cover artist. Unfortunately, I have yet to receive a response.

If one looks at the covers to SHADOW MYSTERY #317 to #320, dated December 1947/January 1948 through June/July 1948, the five covers that shoofly has attributed to Charles Ravel are very similar in style to these four covers. The cover art for SHADOW MYSTERY #317 to #320 has been attributed to artist Walter Swenson. The artist's signature is noticeable on three of the f…

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EDLIS Café EDLIS Café 10 May 2020
1

Bob Dylan and The Shadow

­Bob Dylan's newest song, False Prophet, uses a Shadow cover for its image.

False Prophet  on the album Rough and Rowdy Ways (2020)


EDLIS Café 

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Alschroeder3 Alschroeder3 8 August 2017
0

REIGN OF TERROR Review Shadow 320

This is the last of the Bruce Elliott Shadow novels, and in it, The Shadow returns AS The Shadow, in full force. Granted, he doesn't really sound like himself in many cases---sometimes saying, "Yeah" instead of "Yes."  Burbank at one point transfers Hawkeye's call directly to the Shadow, rather than tasking the information and replaying Hawkeye's info to The Shadow, as Gibson would.  Still, it's a really good novel, very hard-boiled, starting out with thugs threatening to use thumb screws on a surgeon, a protection racket hitting many levels of the city (actresses being threatened with acid to ruin their faces, etc.) and a really good climax where The Shadow is threatened by death by high-pressure boiling steam or escaping into the lion's …

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Alschroeder3 Alschroeder3 8 May 2017
1

The Python: Review

"The Python" sounds like a corny masked menace, but it is anything but.  First off, the Shadow is in MORE troiuble than I've ever seen him from the get-go.  A chance automobile accident delivers the Shadow, as Cranston, in the hands of thugs---and these thugs, smarter than the usual, look in his briefcase, see his cloak and slouch hat, put two and two together, and realize this well-dressed gentlemen is the hated Shadow.  The actual mastermind, called the Python (but no corny costume, that's just his nickname, like Scarface or Babyface or Pretty Boy Floyd) has the Shadow tied up and helpless at the very begining of the novel.  Later he buries the Shadow in a holding cell underneath a construction project in the river, and one of his thugs …

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Alschroeder3 Alschroeder3 26 April 2017
1

ATOMS OF DEATH: Review

The premise is more sf than usual in The Shadow, a deadly invention (a distintegration ray, no less!) by a scientist, and one would think it was more suited for Doc Savage.   Actually, one of the best Shadow novels ever, with the real Lamont Cranston appearing and the Shadow letting the criminals think the real Lamont Cranston is the Shadow (and vice versa) which leads to the real Cranston being kidnapped.  (Cranston sure is a lot more patient with the Shadow usurping his ID than I would be.) The Shadow is badly injured--twice. Cliff Marsland, the Shadow's underworld agent, is held captive, Harry Vincent poses as the Shadow at one point and agents Vincent and Mann play a chess game to determine who will risk their life for the Shadow. All …

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